DermBlog

Causes of Acne: The Real Role of Milk, Chocolate and Fish

Craig Kraffert, MD

For years people have speculated on possible acne triggers. Medical dogma and old wives’ tales abound. Yet the real scientific question has, for the most part, been relatively unaddressed by scientific study: are there lifestyle elements that make acne better or worse? Historically, there has been little population-based data relating to which environmental factors protect against or increase the risk of acne. This year, however, an Italian study of more than 200 acne sufferers has shed light on the relationship of acne to several lifestyle and situational factors. Read More

More Than Skin Deep - The Latest on Vitamin D, Movement and the Mind

Craig Kraffert, MD

In this age of rapid scientific discovery, even a day can make a difference in the lives and health of our families and friends, and the world at large. Since my last post on Vitamin D, new revelations on the importance of this vitamin have been published. These findings, based on three important new studies, suggest that Vitamin D supplementation may help prevent development of Alzheimer’s disease and decreased mental function over time, especially in women. Further studies indicate that failure to receive enough Vitamin D may increase the risk of impaired physical mobility in both men and women. Read More

Vitamin D and Skin Cancer Prevention

Craig Kraffert, MD

The relationship between Vitamin D and skin cancer is multi-faceted. The reasons are numerous but focus on two conflicting considerations. Traditionally, healthy levels of Vitamin D have been considered to be partially dependent on sun exposure. Yet the amount of sun exposure required for internal production of enough Vitamin D to ensure optimal health increases sun damage and the cumulative risk of skin cancer -- the conflict is a bit like a risk and benefit tango. Read More

Winter Itch - Dry Skin Eczema

Craig Kraffert, MD

As summer turns to fall and fall to winter, atmospheric humidity levels tend to drop, especially when cold weather requires heating of indoor spaces by forced air, as is typical in the continental United States. This low indoor humidity factor is often the 'straw that breaks the camel's back' of skin barrier integrity, which results in itchy, rash-prone skin. Read More

New Horizons in Rosacea Treatment

Craig Kraffert, MD

As discussed in my last post, rosacea is a condition with multiple contributory factors, many of which are still being discovered through scientific investigation. Medical understanding of the many facets of rosacea is growing incrementally clearer each year. Read More

Causes of Rosacea - Recent Scientific Discoveries Offer New Explanations

Craig Kraffert, MD

Rosacea is a common age-old skin disorder with multiple clinical variants and skin findings including acne-like pimples, exaggerated facial flushing and persistent redness along with enlarged blood vessels and (sometimes) oil glands. Environmental triggers such as sun, wind, spicy foods, alcohol, hot beverages and stress, among others, have been identified. While these triggers all lead to facial flushing, the exact causal mechanisms of rosacea remain only partly understood. Current treatment options are not always based on targeting identified causes and are not always entirely satisfying for patients. Read More

Accutane for Acne

Craig Kraffert, MD

Over the past hundred years, an exceptionally large array of medications has been made available for patients with dermatologic diseases and disorders. Only a small subset of these medications is revolutionary and even fewer might be euphemistically considered ‘miracle drugs.’ The dermatology medications in this ‘miracle’ category include penicillin for syphilis, cortisone cream for rashes, Valtrex for herpes, Lamisil for nail fungus, Stelara for psoriasis, Botox for scowl lines and Accutane for acneRead More

West Nile Virus Skin Rashes

Craig Kraffert, MD

West Nile Virus (WNV) arrived in North America via New York City in 1999. During that year, 62 cases of WNV were reported. The peak of reported WNV cases occurred in 2002 when almost 3,000 North American cases were officially reported and almost 300 Americans died from the disease. Read More

Skin Cancer

Craig Kraffert, MD

Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers diagnosed in the United States. More than 2 million Americans develop basal or squamous cell carcinoma (the two common forms of skin cancer) each year. Melanoma, a more serious form of skin cancer, is diagnosed in more than 75,000 Americans annually. Read More