Age-Proof Your Skin

Craig Kraffert, MD

The May 2015 issue of MORE Magazine features Dr. Kraffert in an article titled “Age-Proof Your Skin.” This story focuses on how environmental factors affect our skin, offering tips from experts in dermatology on ways to prevent excess skin damage caused by external elements.   Read More

The State of Sunscreen Innovation in 2015

Craig Kraffert, MD

Dermascope features Dr. Kraffert’s byline article, “The State of Sunscreen Innovation in 2015,” in its April 2015 Sun Care issue. Credited as board certified dermatologist and president of Amarte, Dr. Kraffert discusses how sunscreen safety, efficacy and elegance have improved, and speaks to the current FDA approved sunscreen filters as well as potential changes that lie ahead and what advancements that may bring to the category. Read More

The Truth About The Korean Beauty Routine

Craig Kraffert, MD

The Coveteur features Dr. Kraffert in “The Truth About The Korean Beauty Routine.” The editors work to simplify the elusive idea of Korean regimens, saying “What we’ve learned is that it isn’t a one-size-fits-all type deal nor is it that difficult. To help you (and us) mine the hotbed of info, we went to the experts to tell us why it’s actually worth your time and money.” Dr. Kraffert is one of the three experts featured. Read More

The Best Over-the-Counter Skin Care Ingredients for 4 Common Problems

Craig Kraffert, MD

In this QualityHealth.com story, the editor writes, "Acne, warts, fine lines and wrinkles, and dry, sensitive skin are irritating (in more ways than one), but these skin problems don’t always require a trip to the doctor. Board-certified dermatologist Craig Kraffert, MD, of California’s ReddingDerm Clinical & Aesthetic Dermatology practice, highlights the most effective topical treatments for each of these common skin conditions and how to use them to their best advantage. Read More

Eye Skin Care

Craig Kraffert, MD

Dermascope features Dr. Kraffert’s byline article on Eye Skin Care in its February 2015  issue.  Dr Kraffert shares education and advice on delivering rejuvenating and anti-aging benefits to the eye area, including a section emphasizing the importance of antioxidants and moisturizers like argan oil and mushroom B-glucan.  Read More

The Future Of Skin Care

Craig Kraffert, MD

Refinery29.com features Dr. Kraffert's quotes in an article titled “The Future of Skin Care.” This story discusses skin care topics and advancements that dermatologists expect to become more prevalent in 2015.  Dr. Kraffert's insight is featured in relation to SPF advances and how the days of thick, uncomfortable sunscreens may be over due to the new pending FDA requirements. Read More

Male Standard Interview | Melanoma in Men: How to Protect Your Skin

Craig Kraffert, MD

As long as the sun – and its harmful UV rays – remains in the sky, the risk of melanoma or skin cancer exists. However, this may mean we should banish ourselves to living indoors for the rest of our lives. Some people believe that the sun exposure has benefits in that it promotes Vitamin D and  'feel good' endorphin production - but can UV light exposure help maintain a healthy, balanced life? Read More

The New Antioxidants - Part 1 | Ginkgo Nut Extract

Craig Kraffert, MD

Dermascope features Dr. Kraffert’s byline article on Ginkgo Nut Extract in the June issue, as part of his three-part series on “The New Antioxidants” found in Amarte products. Credited as board certified dermatologist and president of Amarte, he writes “Some of the more new, interesting antioxidants consist primarily of plant extracts containing bioactive molecules that often extend beyond antioxidant benefits to include anti-inflammatory and even potential anti-cancer effects.”  Read More

The Truth About Acne and Accutane

Craig Kraffert, MD

Accutane, or isotretinoin, is an FDA approved prescription medicine used to treat severe cystic acne. The difference between Accutane and conventional acne treatment is that Accutane induces a predictable and durable remission from acne. In layman's terms, this means that Accutane is frequently a 'curative' treatment for acne sufferers who are reasonable candidates for a course of Accutane therapy. Read More

Sunscreen and Driving

Craig Kraffert, MD

Recent studies have found that many people don’t apply sunscreen before driving. This is mainly due to the misconception that vehicle glass shields skin from the damaging effects of sun exposure. Unfortunately, at this time this is not generally true.   Read More

Aging Skin

Craig Kraffert, MD

As people grow older, their skin develops changes in both appearance and texture. It becomes drier, more wrinkled and various growths may appear. The skin also tends to heal more slowly. Read More

Canker Sores

Craig Kraffert, MD

Canker sores are painful, round or oval red ulcers in the mouth that typically have a yellowish or grayish center. Also referred to as aphthous stomatitis, canker sores are a common problem that affects at least 20 percent of the population at one time or another.  Read More

Seborrheic Dermatitis

Craig Kraffert, MD

Seborrheic (seb-o-re’ik) dermatitis is a common skin rash that tends to occur on oily skin areas such as the scalp, ears, and face as well as occasionally on the chest, back, arms and legs. It responds readily to treatment and is not contagious. Seborrheic dermatitis typically arises after puberty and tends to become milder later in life. A variant of seborrheic dermatitis called cradle cap occurs in newborns and usually goes away without treatment during the first year of life. Read More

Melasma

Craig Kraffert, MD

Melasma, or chloasma, is a skin condition in which brown patches develop primarily on the cheekbones, forehead and upper lip. Melasma is also often seen on the nose, chin, lower cheeks and lateral neck. The dark patches typically have distinct edges with pigmentation being deposited in one or more layers of the skin. Melasma may be confined to the outer layer of skin, the epidermis, or it may be present solely in the inner layer of skin, the dermis. Generally, however, it is present to a greater or lesser degree in both outer layers of skin.  Read More

Skin Cancer Awareness

Craig Kraffert, MD

Did you know that more than 3.5 million new skin cancer cases are likely to be diagnosed in the U.S. this year? That’s why it’s important for you to protect your skin from the sun’s harmful rays and know how to detect skin cancers early so they may be treated. Read More

Nail Fungus

Craig Kraffert, MD

Nail fungus is an unsightly, common condition that usually presents in mid-life or later years. Generally, nail fungus involves the toenails and presents as a yellowing, crumbling or thickening of the nails, especially at the edge nearest to where the nails are cut. This sometimes results in discomfort, but usually is painless.  Read More

Cold Sores and Herpes Simplex

Craig Kraffert, MD

Herpes simplex virus, or HSV, skin infections are very common. By some estimates, up to 95 percent of adults in the United States tested will demonstrate antibodies indicating past exposure to this virus. The manifestations of herpes simplex virus exposure range from undetected one time infection to recurrent debilitating eruptions. Read More

Poison Oak, Poison Ivy and Poison Sumac

Craig Kraffert, MD

Poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac are the main causes of allergic skin rashes in North America. Of these, poison oak and poison ivy are most common with oak being prevalent in western North America and ivy being prevalent in the east. These plants belong to the genus Toxicodendron. The name is fitting as it describes two distinctive attributes of these plants. Toxic refers to the fact that significant contact with these plants often causes severe symptoms and dendron refers to the tentacle-like nature of the branches that seem designed to promote contact with all who come too close. All parts of these plants - leaves, branches, berries and roots - contain toxic resinous oil called urushiol (you-ROO-shee-ol) that is responsible for the plants’ allergic properties. Read More

Keratosis Pilaris

Craig Kraffert, MD

Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a skin condition that commonly shows up as rough bumps around hair follicles on the back of and outer side of the upper arms. KP is a common and generally harmless condition that can be quite bothersome. Worldwide, approximate one in two people have KP, which is inherited in a dominant fashion. Only one copy of the KP gene is required for KP to develop. If one parent has KP, the chance of the couple’s child having KP is at least 50 percent. If both parents have the condition, the odds are even higher. Read More

Tips for Better Shaving

Craig Kraffert, MD

Razor bumps, ingrown hairs and shaving irritation are common skin care concerns. Razor bumps and ingrown hairs on bearded skin are called PFB (pseudofolliculitis barbae). In most cases, these shaving concerns can be minimized by a combination of proper shaving practices, appropriate shaving equipment and select topical treatments. Read More

Dermapen: Advanced Skin Resurfacing in Redding, CA

Craig Kraffert, MD

Aesthetic dermatology is a sophisticated subspecialty of dermatology that is near and dear to our hearts at Redding Derm. While we remain alert to new innovations within cosmetic dermatology, we’ve been selective with our offerings to ensure that we provide our patients with the most cost-effective, cutting edge treatments that give the best results. Read More

Management of Hyperhidrosis – Excessive Sweating

Craig Kraffert, MD

Hyperhidrosis is a medical term that, simply translated, means excessive sweating. Excessive sweating serves no significant temperature regulatory or excretory function. Hyperhidrosis has its basic origin in the nervous system architecture. The tendency towards hyperhidrosis arises as a result of unique circumstances during development of the nervous system in utero. Read More

Probiotics, Linolenic Acid and Childhood Eczema/Atopic Dermatitis

Craig Kraffert, MD

Atopic dermatitis is the medical name for childhood eczema, a condition that is quite troublesome for many children. Also frequently called atopic eczema, this condition is in most cases best thought of as a tendency towards dry and sensitive skin during childhood. Over time, most children outgrow eczema. Though several remedies and interventions have been tried to help prevent or lessen its severity, they have yielded unclear or uncertain results. Read More

Causes of Acne: The Real Role of Milk, Chocolate and Fish

Craig Kraffert, MD

For years people have speculated on possible acne triggers. Medical dogma and old wives’ tales abound. Yet the real scientific question has, for the most part, been relatively unaddressed by scientific study: are there lifestyle elements that make acne better or worse? Historically, there has been little population-based data relating to which environmental factors protect against or increase the risk of acne. This year, however, an Italian study of more than 200 acne sufferers has shed light on the relationship of acne to several lifestyle and situational factors. Read More

More Than Skin Deep - The Latest on Vitamin D, Movement and the Mind

Craig Kraffert, MD

In this age of rapid scientific discovery, even a day can make a difference in the lives and health of our families and friends, and the world at large. Since my last post on Vitamin D, new revelations on the importance of this vitamin have been published. These findings, based on three important new studies, suggest that Vitamin D supplementation may help prevent development of Alzheimer’s disease and decreased mental function over time, especially in women. Further studies indicate that failure to receive enough Vitamin D may increase the risk of impaired physical mobility in both men and women. Read More

Vitamin D and Skin Cancer Prevention

Craig Kraffert, MD

The relationship between Vitamin D and skin cancer is multi-faceted. The reasons are numerous but focus on two conflicting considerations. Traditionally, healthy levels of Vitamin D have been considered to be partially dependent on sun exposure. Yet the amount of sun exposure required for internal production of enough Vitamin D to ensure optimal health increases sun damage and the cumulative risk of skin cancer -- the conflict is a bit like a risk and benefit tango. Read More

Winter Itch - Dry Skin Eczema

Craig Kraffert, MD

As summer turns to fall and fall to winter, atmospheric humidity levels tend to drop, especially when cold weather requires heating of indoor spaces by forced air, as is typical in the continental United States. This low indoor humidity factor is often the 'straw that breaks the camel's back' of skin barrier integrity, which results in itchy, rash-prone skin. Read More

New Horizons in Rosacea Treatment

Craig Kraffert, MD

As discussed in my last post, rosacea is a condition with multiple contributory factors, many of which are still being discovered through scientific investigation. Medical understanding of the many facets of rosacea is growing incrementally clearer each year. Read More

Causes of Rosacea - Recent Scientific Discoveries Offer New Explanations

Craig Kraffert, MD

Rosacea is a common age-old skin disorder with multiple clinical variants and skin findings including acne-like pimples, exaggerated facial flushing and persistent redness along with enlarged blood vessels and (sometimes) oil glands. Environmental triggers such as sun, wind, spicy foods, alcohol, hot beverages and stress, among others, have been identified. While these triggers all lead to facial flushing, the exact causal mechanisms of rosacea remain only partly understood. Current treatment options are not always based on targeting identified causes and are not always entirely satisfying for patients. Read More

Accutane for Acne

Craig Kraffert, MD

Over the past hundred years, an exceptionally large array of medications has been made available for patients with dermatologic diseases and disorders. Only a small subset of these medications is revolutionary and even fewer might be euphemistically considered ‘miracle drugs.’ The dermatology medications in this ‘miracle’ category include penicillin for syphilis, cortisone cream for rashes, Valtrex for herpes, Lamisil for nail fungus, Stelara for psoriasis, Botox for scowl lines and Accutane for acneRead More

West Nile Virus Skin Rashes

Craig Kraffert, MD

West Nile Virus (WNV) arrived in North America via New York City in 1999. During that year, 62 cases of WNV were reported. The peak of reported WNV cases occurred in 2002 when almost 3,000 North American cases were officially reported and almost 300 Americans died from the disease. Read More

Skin Cancer

Craig Kraffert, MD

Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers diagnosed in the United States. More than 2 million Americans develop basal or squamous cell carcinoma (the two common forms of skin cancer) each year. Melanoma, a more serious form of skin cancer, is diagnosed in more than 75,000 Americans annually. Read More